Daisy Rockwell Biography

Daisy Rockwell Biography

Daisy Rockwell (Born. 1969) is an American Hindi and Urdu language translator and artist. She has translated a number of classic works of Hindi and Urdu literature, including Upendranath Ashk’s Falling Walls, Bhisham Sahni’s Tamas, and Khadija Mastur’s The Women’s Courtyard.

Daisy Rockwell Biography

Daisy Rockwell is also a painter and translator of Hindi and Urdu literature, living in northern New England. She paints under the takhallus, or alias, Lapata (pronounced ‘laapataa’), which is Urdu for “missing,” or “absconded,” as in “my luggage is missing,” or “the bandits have absconded.” She posts her paintings regularly to Flickr, and has shown her work widely. Her 2021 translation of Geetanjali Shree’s Tomb of Sand was the first South Asian book to win the International Booker Prize.

Personal life

Rockwell grew up in a family of artists in western Massachusetts, some whose work adorns the surfaces of chinaware and brightens up the waiting rooms of dentists’ offices, and others whose artistic output has found more select audiences. From 1992-2006, she made a detour into Academia, from which she emerged with a PhD in South Asian literature, a book on the Hindi author Upendranath Ashk and a mild case of depression.

Rockwell grew up in western Massachusetts. Both her parents are artists. She is the granddaughter of the painter, illustrator, and author Norman Rockwell.

Education

Rockwell has been a student of Hindi, Latin, French, German, and ancient Greek for many years. She received her PhD in South Asian Literature from the University of Chicago, where she studied Hindi literature, translation, and social sciences under A K Ramanujan, Susanne Hoeber Rudolph and Colin P Masica. In 1998, she received a grant to write her PhD dissertation on the Hindi author Upendranath Ashk.

Works

Rockwell has published numerous translations from Hindi and Urdu, including her collection of translations of selected stories by Upendranath Ashk, Hats and Doctors (Penguin, 2013), Ashk’s Falling Walls (Penguin, 2015), Bhisham Sahni’s Tamas (Penguin, 2016), and Khadija Mastur’s The Women’s Courtyard (Penguin, 2018). Her translation of Krishna Sobti’s final novel, A Gujarat Here, A Gujarat There (Penguin, 2019) is the first South Asian book to be awarded the Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for a Translation of a Literary Work in 2020. Her translation of Geetanjali Shree’s Tomb of Sand (Tilted Axis Press, 2021) was the first South Asian book to be shortlisted for the International Booker Prize; it went on to win the 2022 edition.

 Read it also:  Biography of Geetanjali Shree

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